Petrol and diesel prices in the UK

Introduction

Petrol and diesel prices in the UK are on the rise, with the average cost of a litre nearing £2.00. If you’re filling up at your local garage or supermarket, you’ll notice that prices fluctuate all the time – some days they might be high, others they might be low. It can feel like a game of Russian roulette trying to find the best deal, but this guide will help you out! We’ll tell you what’s going on with UK petrol prices right now and how much it costs to buy fuel from different sources (including supermarkets).

Government tax

Petrol prices have fallen by a few pence litre on average, as the cost of oil has dropped. But this is only part of the story.

The government also charges tax on top of this, which means that petrol prices in the UK are still among the highest in Europe. So how do other countries compare?

And what could be done to bring down the cost of motoring? Here’s everything you need to know about petrol prices in Britain and around the world…

One key question

One key question is whether the government will cut one very important cost they can – petrol tax.

In recent months, oil prices have fallen sharply and many experts expect them to stay low for some time.

The government fuel tax rate is 52.95 pence per litre plus VAT is also applied after the Fuel duty at 20% which is 10.59 pence.

Prices at petrol stations

You can find the best prices at a petrol station by comparing the price per litre in different places (Petrol and diesel prices in the UK) If you’re looking for the cheapest fuel, check whether it’s cheaper to fill up at the supermarket or garage. Or maybe you should just go online?

  • You might find that supermarkets sell diesel for less than garages and petrol stations, but be aware that this isn’t always true. In some cases, it could even be more expensive!
  • Check how much your local garage charges compared to other nearby garages before filling up your car’s tank with fuel.

Petrol prices

The cost of petrol in the UK is much higher than in the US. Petrol costs about $1.13 per litre on average in America.

Diesel prices

Diesel prices are more expensive than petrol in the UK, Europe and Australia. In the US, however, diesel is typically less expensive than petrol.

Why is fuel so much more expensive in the UK? Well, there’s no simple answer to that question. The high cost of living in England means that everything from groceries to home heating costs more for residents than other countries—and that includes petrol and diesel prices as well!

Supermarket petrol prices compared

So how exactly do supermarket petrol prices compare to the rest of the industry?

While you get a discount on your fuel when you fill up at a supermarket, it’s not as big as you might think. The price of petrol at supermarkets is usually about 1p per litre lower than that charged by other retailers, but this doesn’t come close to covering the actual cost of buying it from wholesalers. The wholesale price is around 4p less than what supermarkets sell their fuel for – and remember, we looked at only one cost here: that of transportation. There are other expenses involved in bringing products like food or drinks into stores, including storage costs and packaging materials such as plastic bottles (for fruit juices).

Transporting petrol and diesel

  • Petrol and diesel are flammable, so you need to be careful when transporting them.
  • You can transport petrol and diesel in a car, truck or van.
  • Some cars can hold up to 20 litres of fuel at a time, while some trucks can carry hundreds of litres at once!
  • If using a tank, make sure it’s securely sealed so there’s no leakage risk as this would cause an explosion if ignited by nearby sources such as sparks from machinery or lightning strikes (lightning doesn’t strike often though).

Conclusion

We hope that this article has helped you to understand the basics of fuel prices in the UK.

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