Charging an electric car surges by 42% in 4 months

Introduction

The price of charging an electric car has soared by 42 per cent in just 4 months, new research reveals. The cost of recharging a vehicle has increased from 15p per mile to 18p per mile.

The charge is compared to petrol prices which stand at 19 pence per mile on average and diesel which is 21p, according to AA figures.

The Government’s aim is for half of all new cars sold in 2030 to be ultra-low emission but that would mean getting millions of people off petrol and diesel, said Edmund King, president of the Automobile Association.

‘We need more than just electric vehicles,’ he added: ‘we need cleaner air too.’

The cost of charging an electric car in the UK has surged by 42 per cent in just four months, new research reveals.

The cost of charging an electric car in the UK has surged by 42 per cent in just four months, new research reveals.

It now costs 18p per mile to fully charge an electric car.

It now costs 18p per mile to fully charge an electric car – or 8p per mile when using off-peak electricity. This compares with 19p for petrol. The cost of charging has been steadily increasing for several years, but the sharp rise over the last four months is due to changes in the way customers are billed and how much they have to pay for using their cars. Previously, drivers paid a fixed rate for fuel on top of buying the electricity itself from their supplier (or directly from an energy provider). Now that principle has been reversed with most providers switching to a system that covers both charges together and which has resulted in higher costs overall.

The price hike for recharging electric cars comes as the Government plans to ban the sale of all new conventional petrol and diesel cars from 2030.

The price of charging an electric car has surged by 42% in just four months, a study shows.

The cost of recharging an electric vehicle (EV) has risen from 18p per mile in March to almost 22p per mile now, according to research by Zebra Finance and Go Ultra Low campaign group.

The increase comes as the Government plans to ban the sale of all new conventional petrol and diesel cars from 2030. But campaigners say the jump in prices means drivers may still be better off buying a standard car than paying for electricity on top of their fuel bills.

The AA warned that the soaring cost of charging up a vehicle could pose a problem for some drivers.

The cost of filling up an electric car is becoming more expensive than petrol, which could pose a problem for some drivers.

The AA warned that the soaring cost of charging up a vehicle could pose a problem for some drivers. Chief executive Edmund King said: “Drivers can no longer rely on the industry to keep costs down as it has been doing for years.”

A fully-charged car such as a Kia E-Niro will typically have a range of around 260 miles, according to figures on the cost comparison site uSwitch.com.

A fully-charged car such as a Kia E-Niro will typically have a range of around 260 miles, according to figures on the cost comparison site uSwitch.com.

That’s the equivalent of driving from London to Edinburgh and back, or from York to Leeds and back – so you can see why these cars are so popular with those who regularly commute long distances for work.

It also means that you don’t need to worry about running out of petrol. If you do drain all your power mid-journey, then there’s usually somewhere nearby where you can charge up again – either at home or at work if they have charging points in their car park.

Should you buy an electric vehicle?

Fuel prices have been falling in the UK – but you’d be better off buying an electric vehicle.

Are electric cars really cheaper to run than petrol or diesel? The answer is yes, according to new research from car finance company Compare the Market.

Conclusion

If you’re thinking of getting an electric car, it’s important to understand how much they cost. But if you’re able to charge at home and use off-peak electricity, then the cost may not be too bad.

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